Rosana Castrillo Diaz

June 29 – July 30, 2009

 

Untitled, 2009

Mica and silk tissue paper

60 x 96 inches

152.4 x 244 cm

RCD# 6/14/2009

 

Untitled, 2009

Mica on silk tissue paper

24 x 24 inches

61 x 61 cm

RCD# 5/25/2009

 

Untitled, 2009

Graphite on paper

12 7/8 x 17 inches

32.7 x 43.2 cm

RCD# 5/10/2009

 

Untitled, 2009

Cotton quilt batting

32 x 64 inches

81.3 x 162.6 cm

RCD# 6/24/2009

 

Untitled, 2009

Cotton quilt batting

32 x 64 inches

81.3 x 162.6 cm

RCD# 6/24/2009

Detail view

 

Untitled, 2009
Cotton quilt batting

81 x 156 inches

206 x 396 cm

RCD# 6/19/2009

 

Untitled, 2009

Cotton quilt batting

20 x 20 inches

50.8 x 50.8 cm

RCD# 6/25/2009

Press Release

 

Anthony Meier Fine Arts is pleased to announce an exhibition of new work by San Francisco artist Rosana Castrillo Diaz.  Castrillo Diaz’s second gallery exhibition exudes a quietness and simplicity that belies the rigid structural details of her works construction.

 

Showing a suite of dense and intricate graphite on paper drawings as well as looser wall relief sculptures made individually of cotton batting and silk paper, Castrillo Diaz employs varying mediums to the same end.  Her investigation of the fine line separating representation and abstraction and the nuances of shadow and light highlights her adept use of materials.

 

In a new body of reliefs, Castrillo Diaz manipulates silk tissue paper painted with mica into three-dimensional wall works.  Folding, layering and tearing the tissue creates a depth of shadow distinct to the micas surface that shimmers and reflects light.  This contrasting play of light illuminates the work from within.

 

Hovering at the edge of perception is another debut, a series of tall vertical strips of cotton quilt batting that dissolve and reappear as light moves through and around.  The delineation of visual line is further blurred by the deceptive depth of shadow created by the thin strips.

 

The elusive and ephemeral qualities of Castrillo Diaz’s works require the viewer to focus.  Her graphite drawings contain details that could easily be overlooked in a fleeting glance.  Her use of ordinary and fragile materials to transcend the tangible and question lines of perception is masterful.

 

Castrillo Diaz is in the collection of the SFMOMA, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the UC Berkeley Art Museum and the Mills College Art Museum.  The UCSF Mission Bay campus features a permanent wall mural on the second floor of their Community Center building. A site-specific commission by the artist is currently on view on the bridge to the new San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Rooftop Garden.