Tavares Strachan

SEEING IS FORGETTING THE THING THAT YOU SAW

November 6 - 11 December 2015

Tavares Strachan

Rosalind, 2014-2015

Collage, pigment and graphite on moab paper, 

encased in plexiglas

In four parts

30 3/8 x 30 3/8 x 2 inches each (77.2 x 77.2 x 5.1 cm)

60 3/4 x 60 3/4 x 2 inches overall (154.3 x 154.3 x 5.1 cm)

Unique example in a series

Tavares Strachan
The Invisibles (Rosalind Franklin), 2014-2015
Scientific tools, mineral oil, Plexiglas, glass, wood
16 x 29 x 8 inches
40.6 x 73.7 x 20.3 cm

Tavares Strachan
The Invisibles (Rosalind Franklin), 2014-2015
Cricket bat, mineral oil, Plexiglas, glass, wood
43 x 13 x 13 inches
109.2 x 33 x 33 cm

Tavares Strachan
The Invisibles (Rosalind Franklin), 2014-2015
Microscope, mineral oil, Plexiglas, glass, wood
21 x 12 x 12 inches
53.3 x 30.5 x 30.5 cm

 

Tavares Strachan
The Invisibles (Rosalind Franklin), 2014-2015
Nurse shoes, mineral oil, Plexiglas, glass, wood
23 x 16 x 17 inches
58.4 x 40.6 x 43.2 cm

Tavares Strachan
The Invisibles (Rosalind Franklin), 2014-2015
Cricket ball, mineral oil, Plexiglas, glass, wood
14 x 17 x 14 inches
35.6 x 43.2 x 35.6 cm

Tavares Strachan

C, 2014-2015

Digital transfer and oil on linen

72 x 72 inches

182.9 x 182.9 cm

Tavares Strachan

D, 2014-2015

Digital transfer and oil on linen

72 x 72 inches

182.9 x 182.9 cm

STRA056

Tavares Strachan
What Will Be Remembered in the Face of All that Is Forgotten, 2014-2015
Neon sculpture, stainless steel, nine transformers, MDF
Dimensions variable

Press Release

Tavares Strachan
Seeing is Forgetting the Thing that You Saw

6 November through 11 December 2015

Opening reception: Thursday 5 November, 6 to 8pm*

 

 

Anthony Meier Fine Arts is pleased to present an exhibition of new work by New York-based artist Tavares Strachan.

 

Strachan has spent the past decade investigating the nature of invisibility and the way a given society determines which aspects of culture become a part of its historical narrative and which parts are erased. The artist is considering aesthetics as a part of society’s established power structure that guides who and what becomes relevant over time.

 

Seeing is Forgetting the Thing that You Saw continues the artist’s examination of individuals who have made significant achievements but whose names and contributions go widely unnoticed; these works question which details have been omitted from common accounts of history. The exhibition highlights English scientist Rosalind Franklin, whose research led to the discovery of DNA’s molecular structures. The exhibition’s centerpiece is a suspended, life-sized neon sculpture depicting Franklin’s flickering circulatory system – a nod to her key contribution to the field of science. Franklin’s face is immortalized as a portrait in four parts, collaged from myriad encyclopedic illustrations of figures and events relative to Rosalind’s life.

 

A series of vitrines – The Invisibles – display Franklin’s tools and possessions in museum-like curio cases. These objects, half actual and half depicted referentially, are based on tangible achievements according to historic record. 

 

Tavares Strachan was featured in Prospect.3 in New Orleans 2014, and he represented the Bahamas in the 55th Venice Biennale in 2013. Seeing is Forgetting the Thing that You Saw is his first exhibition at Anthony Meier Fine Arts.

 

*complimentary valet parking